Is the Only Safe Answer to Car Hackers Driving an Older Model?

16
June
2016
Have you shopped around Lubbock looking for used recent-model year vehicles with the latest wireless technology, smartphone integration, built-in apps, and Wi-Fi hotspot?
 
Owning one might be asking for trouble from hackers.
 
White Hat hackers Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek teamed up to hack their way into a Jeep set up with wireless Uconnect software. From their laptops at home, the duo shut off the engine and cut the brakes while the vehicle was driving down a highway.
 
Miller and Valasek teamed up with a willing volunteer victim who knew what was coming, so nobody was hurt in the experiment.
 
White Hat hackers find security flaws in technology so that problems can be fixed.
 
Because White Hat hackers threatened to reveal a tutorial on how to hack a Jeep, automakers responded by tightening up security.
 
Unfortunately, there are always Black Hat hackers out there looking just as hard for bugs to exploit; any vehicle with sufficient connected technology may be at risk.
 
Another reason to be wary about self-driving vehicles.
 
The only way to completely eliminate the risk of the computer in your vehicle being hacked is to find an older model that doesn’t have wireless features.
 
It’s probably near impossible to find a new car that isn't wirelessly connected in some way. However, Fiesta Motors of Lubbock has used vehicles in our inventory to satisfy the customer who doesn’t want to fiddle with—or be susceptible to—gadgets and gizmos.
 
Visit one of our two buy-here pay-here dealerships in Lubbock for a diverse selection of model years and features from the most advanced to the most old-school.
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